Home » Loose Sandhills, The Story of Salishan by Mike Stone
Loose Sandhills, The Story of Salishan Mike Stone

Loose Sandhills, The Story of Salishan

Mike Stone

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ISBN :
Kindle Edition
151 pages
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 About the Book 

“It was an opportunity for all of us to do our best”Barbara FealyThey made an unlikely business alliance- the quiet, unassuming Portland multi-millionaire and a major philanthropic force in Oregon- the iconoclastic, acerbic Portland architect- andMore“It was an opportunity for all of us to do our best”Barbara FealyThey made an unlikely business alliance- the quiet, unassuming Portland multi-millionaire and a major philanthropic force in Oregon- the iconoclastic, acerbic Portland architect- and the Portland female landscape architect with fierce independence and gentle creativity.They merged their talents in the 1960s at a former Oregon coast dairy farm 95 miles southwest of Portland. The three would collaborate on a land development on a sand spit and a resort unlike any other in the Pacific Northwest, one that hosted governors, movie stars, and generations of Pacific Northwest families.The resort would be called Salishan Lodge, a melding of native woods and shrubs, a tribute to Northwest artists, an understated elegance, and the defining tribute to the Portlanders- John and Betty Gray, John Storrs, and Barbara Fealy. Gray would later develop other resorts and properties such as Sunriver, Skamania Lodge, Johns Landing, and was the first developer to recognize the potential of Portland’s Pearl District. Storrs would design more architectural masterpieces such as the World Forestry Center- and Fealy would apply her landscape genius to other Oregon lands including Timberline Lodge. But it was Salishan Lodge that would always be highlighted in their biographical sketches, the Salishan Lodge that stood out among the mundane and architecturally drab other Oregon Coast properties.“The Lodge,” as many employees and local residents referredto the resort, would define careers, not only of the three principals but also of later managers and long-time employees. With the sale of the Lodge in 1997 the era was over, ended by corporate insensitivity and new managers without the slightest concept of the amazing coming together of creative forces which built the resort 30 years ago.Salishan was the first of its kind—and perhaps the last. Tight environmental laws, a changing demographic mix and a struggling economy practically guarantee there won’t be a repeat.Barbara Fealy died in 2001, John Storrs died in 2003. John Gray died in 2012. A bronze plate with their names, rescued from the remodeling rubble of the first corporate buyer of Salishan Lodge in 1997, now greets visitors entering the Lodge’s massive front door. But the aura of Salishan Lodge, the Mobil Five-Stars, the long-term employees and the resort’s casual elegance which sprouted from one man’s vision may be lost forever.